Samsung confirms hack to its server putting its users’ data at risk

Samsung is hacked. (photo: Tech Ballad)

The data from an unspecified number of customers from Samsung were stolen from the company’s servers at the end of last July, according to the company itself in an official statement.

The information that is taken from each client is different in each case. Samsung guarantees that data related to social security or credit card will not be affected. However, the hackers they were able to get the name, contact details, demographics, date of birth, and product registration information.

This information is pulled from certain Samsung systems in the United States

The incident occurred in late July and early August last when it was identified after an internal investigation that unspecified customer information had been compromised. In principle, the issue should only affect customers with US registered accounts.

Samsung has ensured that is contacting those affected by this security incident. If a user has not received a email or a Samsung contact, nothing to worry about at the moment.

However, as a general rule, you should still check recent account activity for potential unauthorized logins, use strong passwords, and even enable two-step verification.

Samsung hacked.  (photo: Stuff)
Samsung hacked. (photo: Stuff)

What is Samsung doing about it

“We are committed to protecting the security and privacy of our customers. We have hired leading cybersecurity experts and are coordinating with authorities.” the company said in a statement. “We will continue to work diligently to develop and implement immediate and long-term changes to further improve security across all of our systems.”

Likewise, recommend to users three very important points:

– Remain cautious with any unsolicited communication that requests your personal information or refers the user to a web page that asks for personal information.

– Avoid clicking links or downloading attachments from suspicious emails.

– Review accounts for suspicious activity.

hackers (Photo Credit: ifep.com/Scyther)
hackers (Photo Credit: ifep.com/Scyther)

This is not the first time Samsung has been hacked.

Earlier this year, Samsung was also the victim of a hack. The person in charge, on this occasion, is Fall a group that also extract information from other companies technological What nvidia.

Specific, almost 200 GB of sensitive company data was extractedincluding the source code of several technologies developed by the company itself. What is not extracted, according to Samsung, is that customer information is kept confidential.

There was a security breach related to certain internal company data”, said the company in a statement released by Bloomberg News in March of this year. They also clarified that no impact on their business or with their clients was anticipated.

The Lapsus$ group, which is behind the Nvidia hack, claims responsibility for this attack (REUTERS/Dado Ruvic)
The Lapsus$ group, which is behind the Nvidia hack, claims responsibility for this attack (REUTERS/Dado Ruvic)

“Based on our initial analysis, the violation involves some source code related to the operation of the devices Galaxy, but it does not include the personal information of our consumers or employees. Currently, we do not anticipate any impact on our business or customers. We have implemented measures to prevent further incidents of this type and we will continue to serve our customers without interruption, “as detailed in the statement at the time.

In turn, the secret code of other related companies was published, such as Qualcomm. It should be noted that the South Korean clarified that personal information was stolen from her clients. The company said it had reinforced its internal security measures with the aim of protecting users from any eventuality linked to this episode.

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